'We're thrilled': Parler returns to internet on new platform

Parler, the alternative to Twitter favored by conservatives, returned to the internet Monday after it was kicked offline by Amazon Web Services.

The social media company didn’t announce who is hosting its new servers, saying only that its platform is built on “robust, sustainable, independent technology.”

Amazon shut down Parler’s servers on Jan. 11, days after its app was removed from Apple’s App Store and the Google Play Store. Amazon claimed it made the move as a “last resort” after Parler was deemed to be “unwilling and unable” to address extremist speech.

On Monday, Mark Meckler, the company’s interim CEO, said in a statement that Parler “was built to offer a social-media platform that protects free speech and values privacy and civil discourse.”

“When Parler was taken offline in January by those who desire to silence tens of millions of Americans, our team came together, determined to keep our promise to our highly engaged community that we would return stronger than ever. We’re thrilled to welcome everyone back,” he said.

“Parler is being run by an experienced team and is here to stay. We will thrive as the premier social-media platform dedicated to free speech, privacy and civil dialogue.”

Meckler said the platform’s 20 million users can use their previous login information. Service was being restored on a step-by-step basis, and most users were expected to have access sometime on Monday.

Signups for new users are expected to resume next week.

Parler’s popularity surged after the Nov. 3 presidential election when Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and others stepped up censorship of conservative voices, including banning President Trump.

Parler sued Amazon for its removal of the platform, alleging violation of antitrust laws and collusion with other Big Tech companies.

Parler, which calls itself “the world’s #1 free speech social media platform,” said Monday it is not reliant on “so-called ‘Big Tech'” for its operations.

It is conducting a search for a permanent CEO.

The interim chief, Meckler, is an attorney, entrepreneur and free speech advocate.

The company said he has “expertise in launching, growing and developing effective business and technology models for two of the largest grassroots organizations in modern American history, Tea Party Patriots and Convention of States.”

Fox Business reported the moves against Parler came “as liberals and many media pundits championed the move to de-platform the social media app.”

An Apple official at the time claimed Parler “has not taken adequate measures to address the proliferation of these threats to people‚Äôs safety.”

“We have suspended Parler from the App Store until they resolve these issues.”

Parler’s chief policy officer, Amy Peikoff, told “Fox & Friends Weekend” in January that the company was being singled out even as it surged to No. 1 among free apps.

Just days ago, Parler terminated CEO John Matze.

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This article was originally published by the WND News Center.

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